Warning: The originals photos, texts, films, music, etc ... of the period previous to 1921 year -see the Act of the US Congress about it - have no copyright and belong to the public domain. However, those same pictures, I process this blog, when I restore and paint the pictures, then the right of modification is produced, ie that are protected by full copyright law, in this case mine. Of course there are many more laws in the world, declared in the public domain photographs (which is the topic at hand), in very later dates to the aforementioned (Example: WWII, Korea, etc ...) .

Saturday, March 30, 2013

Clarifying note - Nota aclaratoria


Clarifying note:

A few months ago I switched to Picassa visibility option of my blogs. The result was, in seconds, the disappearance of all the images in my blogs on the Web This what I saw when using the Google Search mode: "IMAGES". Also broken, lost or changed all internal and external links to my three Blogs.
My blog (Tanks, Armored Cars, Self-Propelled Guns and Support Vehicles) dedicated to fighting vehicles of the period from 1924 to 1950, has not been indexed by Google, and this after several months since the "accident".And that is a child of Google Blogger!
Even this blog (Armored Cars in the WWI) has not been indexed, until a couple of weeks.
Many other users Picassa, by that very act of changing visibility, have lost all your data and pictures. This is a serious problem that occurs daily on the Web, and Google should, promptly and diligently to find a solution.
I arrived to wonder seriously definitely close blogs or close them to visitors, as they had deleted a large number of images of my blogs.
To face these challenges, opened two new blogs that I serve as a comparative test. Also created with the idea of
​​using them to dump all information from blogs damaged.
Finally only one I stopped: Armored Vehicles of the WWI, where new posts have gone up, parallel to submit to this.
As the problem of broken links still not been solved, I'll follow up posts, indistinctly in this and the other new blog.

These are the 16 posts that have gone up in "Armored Vehicles of the WWI":

* Lancia Armoured Railcar belonging to the Railway Protection, Repair and Maintenance Corps (R.P.R.&.M.C.) of the Irish National Army, 1922.
* British Lanchester Armoured Car, belonging to RACD-RNAS. Captured by the Germans in Tarnopol area, Galicia, Austria, summer of 1917.
* French Renault Armored Car (Auto-Mitrailleuse Renault) Model 1915. November 1915, Lorraine.
* 'Daimler-Guinness', British Improvised Daimler Armoured Lorry. Rising of Easter Week, Dublin, 1916.
* 'The Bird Cage', British Improvised Crossley Partly-Armoured Car. Dublin, 1920.
* British Isotta-Fraschini Jarrot Armoured Car. Built for the Russian Army in 1914. Only a prototype was manufactured.
* British Lanchester and Ford T Armoured Cars of the RNAS in Romania, summer of 1916.
* U.S. Davidson-Duryea Machine Gun Car. 1899.
* British Peerless Armoured Car. Ireland, 1921.
* Russian Austin Armored Car 1st Series called “Slav” «Славянин» belonging to the 21st Automobile Machine Gun Platoon.
* Belgian Peugeot Armored Cars (Auto-Canons-Mitrailleuses Mle. 1915). Ceded by France to the Belgian Army. Belgium, Ypres, 1918.
* German Daimler leichte Kraftwagen (BaK) with a Krupp 7.7-cm L/27 Anti-Aircraft Gun M1914.
* Auto-Mitrailleuse Charron de la Chevalerie Française. Amiens, France, 1914.
* Dragons on reconnaissance patrol. French Cavalry. Northern Front, France, 1914.
* Reiterpatrouille. Austro-Hungarian Cavalry Patrol. Eastern Front, 1915.
* U.S. Motorcycle MG Platoon. Fort Brown, Texas, USA, 1916.

In this link you can visit the new blog:

http://armoredvehicleswwi.blogspot.com.es/

You can also enter from the sidebar of this blog, click the image pointing arrows.

Thanks for your patience with my "disclaimer".
Jose Luis Castillo


PS-A few days after posting this "Clarification Note" reappear again as normal photographs and illustrations of my blogs on "Images" of Google. Well by chance (in that I do not believe) or because someone from Google has unlocked the loop that prevented the seeker read, the question is who are now visible.
If the second option has been the cause of the recovery of images, thank you very much for that. Now, slowly, I recovered to the level of visits he had four months ago.


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Nota aclaratoria:

Hace unos meses cambié en Picassa la opción de visibilidad de mis blogs. El resultado fue, en cuestión de segundos, la desaparición de todas las imágenes de mis blogs en la Red. Esto lo pude comprobar al utilizar la opción de búsqueda de Google: "IMÁGENES". También se rompieron, se perdieron o se modificaron todos los enlaces internos y externos de mis tres Blogs.
Mi blog (Tanks, Armored Cars, Self-Propelled Guns and Support Vehicles) dedicado a los vehículos de combate del período 1924-1950, aún no ha sido indexado por Google, y esto después de los varios meses transcurridos desde el “accidente”. ¡Y eso que Blogger es hijo de Google!
Incluso este mismo blog (Armored Cars in the WWI) no ha sido indexado, hasta hace un par de semanas.  
Otros muchos usuarios de Picassa, por ese mismo acto de cambio de visibilidad, han perdido todos sus datos e imágenes. Este es un grave problema que ocurre diariamente en la Red, y al que Google debería, con prontitud y diligencia, dar una solución.
Llegué a plantearme seriamente el cerrar definitivamente los blogs, o bien cerrarlos a los visitantes, ya que se habían borrado un gran número de imágenes de mis blogs.
Para enfrentarme a estos problemas, abrí dos nuevos blogs que me sirvieran a modo de tests comparativos.También los creé con la idea de utilizarlos para volcar en ellos toda la información de los blogs dañados.
Finalmente sólo dejé uno de ellos: Armored Vehicles of the WWI, en el que he ido subiendo nuevos posts, paralelamente a los subidos a éste.
Como el problema de los enlaces rotos todavía no se ha solucionado, voy a seguir subiendo posts, indistintamente en éste y en el otro nuevo blog.

Estos son los 16 posts que he ido subiendo en "Armored Vehicles of the WWI":

* Lancia Armoured Railcar belonging to the Railway Protection, Repair and Maintenance Corps (R.P.R.&.M.C.) of the Irish National Army, 1922.
* British Lanchester Armoured Car, belonging to RACD-RNAS. Captured by the Germans in Tarnopol area, Galicia, Austria, summer of 1917.
* French Renault Armored Car (Auto-Mitrailleuse Renault) Model 1915. November 1915, Lorraine.
* 'Daimler-Guinness', British Improvised Daimler Armoured Lorry. Rising of Easter Week, Dublin, 1916.
* 'The Bird Cage', British Improvised Crossley Partly-Armoured Car. Dublin, 1920.
* British Isotta-Fraschini Jarrot Armoured Car. Built for the Russian Army in 1914. Only a prototype was manufactured.
* British Lanchester and Ford T Armoured Cars of the RNAS in Romania, summer of 1916.
* U.S. Davidson-Duryea Machine Gun Car. 1899.
* British Peerless Armoured Car. Ireland, 1921.
* Russian Austin Armored Car 1st Series called “Slav” «Славянин» belonging to the 21st Automobile Machine Gun Platoon.
* Belgian Peugeot Armored Cars (Auto-Canons-Mitrailleuses Mle. 1915). Ceded by France to the Belgian Army. Belgium, Ypres, 1918.
* German Daimler leichte Kraftwagen (BaK) with a Krupp 7.7-cm L/27 Anti-Aircraft Gun M1914.
* Auto-Mitrailleuse Charron de la Chevalerie Française. Amiens, France, 1914.
* Dragons on reconnaissance patrol. French Cavalry. Northern Front, France, 1914.
* Reiterpatrouille. Austro-Hungarian Cavalry Patrol. Eastern Front, 1915.
* U.S. Motorcycle MG Platoon. Fort Brown, Texas, USA, 1916.

En este enlace podéis visitar el nuevo blog:


También podéis entrar desde la barra lateral de este blog, pinchando en la imagen que señalan las flechas.

Gracias por vuestra paciencia con mi “Nota aclaratoria”.
José Luis Castillo

P.S.- Unos días después de publicar esta "Nota aclaratoria", nuevamente vuelven a aparecer con total normalidad las fotografías e ilustraciones de mis blogs en "Imágenes" de Google.  Bien por casualidad (en la que poco creo) o bien porque alguien desde Google ha desbloqueado el bucle que impedía al buscador leerlas, la cuestión es que ahora ya son visibles.
Si ha sido la segunda opción la causa de la recuperación de las imágenes, muchas gracias por ello. Ahora, poco a poco, voy recuperando el nivel de visitas que tenía hace cuatro meses.

French Armored Car Group, belonging to the Cavalry. France, ca. 1917.


Groupe d’Auto-Mitrailleuses et Auto-Canons  de la Cavalerie (GAMAC). France, ca. 1917.



French Armored Car Group belonging to the Cavalry. France, ca. 1917.

During the Great War, the French Groups of Armored Cars - since September 1916 - was assigned to the Cavalry. They were composed of nine armored cars, six armed with 8-mm machine guns (usually on Renault chassis) and three armed with 37-mm cannons (usually on Peugeot chassis).

The groups were made up three sections (called platoons in the British and American armies) equal, each consisting of three armored cars, two armed with machine guns and one cannon.

This singular photograph capture, in a confined space, a French Armored Car Group in full, including crews and support vehicles.
I have pointed arbitrarily, with numbers, the situation of the nine armored cars in the picture.



Grupo de Coches Blindados franceses pertenecientes a la Caballería. Francia, ca. 1917.

Durante la Gran Guerra, los Grupos franceses de coches blindados - desde septiembre de 1916 - fueron adscritos a la Caballería. Estaban compuestos por nueve coches blindados, seis armados con ametralladoras de 8-mm (normalmente sobre chasis Renault) y tres armados con cañones de 37-mm (normalmente sobre chasis Peugeot).

Los Grupos estaban formados por tres secciones iguales (denominadas pelotones en los ejércitos británicos y estadounidenses), cada una compuesta de tres coches blindados, dos armados con ametralladoras y uno con cañón.

Esta singular fotografía capta, en un espacio reducido, un Grupo de Coches Blindados Franceses al completo, incluidas tripulaciones y vehículos de apoyo. He señalado arbitrariamente, con números, la situación de los nueve coches blindados en la fotografía.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

German Partly-Armored Anti-Aircraft Truck (4x4) Daimler-Krupp 7.7-cm (K-Flak). G1455. Ca. 1916.


U.S. Simplex Armored Car, 1915.


U.S. Simplex Armored Car of 1915

The armored car was performed on the chassis of the Toy Tonneau Simplex 4 Passenger 1913 model. The ceramic license plate indicates that this is 1915. Given that license plates of American civilian’s vehicles, at that time, were granted and renewed annually, this indicates that the photograph was made in 1915. This characteristic car license plate (dark with clear numbers and date vertically to the right), reduced to 5 or 6 U.S. states that could belong to this Simplex Armored Car in 1915. The civil right is probably a journalist, so that the photograph corresponds to the public presentation of this armored car.


On identifying this vehicle can see this post of Landships. In it you can see two different ways to confront this issue of identification of an armored car: the one precipitated and erroneous and the other reasoned and correct.
 
TOPIC: Unidentified American Armored Car


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Coche Blindado Simplex norteamericano de 1915

Este coche blindado fue realizado sobre el chasis del modelo Simplex Toy Tonneau 4 Passenger de 1913. La placa cerámica de la matrícula nos indica que ésta es de 1915. Dado que las matrículas en esa época eran concedidas y renovadas anualmente, se deduce que la fotografía fue realizada en 1915. Esta característica matrícula (oscura con los números claros y la fecha en vertical a la derecha) reduce a 5 ó 6 los estados norteamericanos a los que podría pertenecer este Coche Blindado Simplex en 1915. El civil de la fotografía probablemente sea un periodista,  por lo que ésta correspondería a la presentación pública del  coche blindado.


Sobre la identificación de este vehículo podéis ver este post de Landships. En el podréis observar dos formas diferentes de enfrentarse a la cuestión de la identificación de un coche blindado: una precipitada y errónea y la otra razonada y correcta.

TOPIC: Unidentified American Armored Car

German Partly-Armored Anti-Aircraft Truck (4x4) Daimler-Krupp 7.7-cm (K-Flak). G1353. Ca. 1916.


Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Spanish Schneider-Brillié Armored Car, Model 1909. The first "Armored Car" in the world that was used in real war actions.



Schneider-Brillié Armored Car, Model 1909, of the Spanish Army.

It was the first armored car in the world  to be used operationally in actual combat missions (Morocco, January 20, 1912) (*). The crew consisted of 16 men and was armed with two Maxim machine guns and 10 Mauser rifles.

Note the use of colors (or tones contrasting monochrome) of camouflage in the vehicle, something unheard of at the time (winter 1910-1911), since the concept of disruptive forms would not be conceived until 1915, during the First World War.

At the Armored Car Schneider was assigned, in the Spanish Army, denomination: ARTILLERY No. 15.


(*) The second armored car in the world used in combat, was the Italian Fiat-Arsenale, manufactured in Turin in July 1912. Shortly thereafter would be sent to Libya, where he would participate in the last operations of the Italo-Turkish War.


Coche Blindado Schneider-Brillié, del Ejécito Español, Modelo 1909.

Fue el primer coche blindado del mundo que se utilizó operativamente en misiones reales de combate (Marruecos, 20 de enero de 1912) (*). La tripulación constaba de 16 hombres y el vehículo estaba armado con dos ametralladoras Maxim y 10 fusiles Mauser.

Obsérvese la utilización de colores (o tonos mono-cromo contrastados) de camuflaje en el vehículo, algo insólito en ese momento (invierno de 1910-1911), ya que el concepto disruptivo de las formas no sería concebido hasta 1915, durante la Primera Guerra Mundial.

Al Coche Blindado Schneider se le asignó, en el ejército español, la denominación: ARTILLERÍA Nº 15.


(*) El segundo coche blindado en el mundo, utilizado en acciones de combate, fue el Fiat-Arsenale italiano, realizado en Turín en julio de 1912. Unos meses después sería enviado a Libia, donde participaría en las últimas operaciones de la Guerra Italo-Turca.